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IBM ‘Utility Scale’ Quantum Processor Goes to University of Tokyo

The Quantum System One computer will support research into bioinformatics, materials science and finance

Berenice Baker

November 28, 2023

1 Min Read
An IBM Quantum System One quantum computer
IBM has installed a 127-qubit IBM Quantum Eagle processor in the University of Tokyo's Quantum System One computer. IBM

IBM and the University of Tokyo (UTokyo) have installed a 127-qubit IBM Quantum Eagle processor in Japan’s first Quantum System One computer.

It will be used exclusively by scientists taking part in the Quantum Innovation Initiative Consortium (QIIC), which aims to advance quantum science, business and education in Japan. They plan to use the new processor for quantum research in bioinformatics, high-energy physics, materials science, finance and other areas.

The IBM Quantum Eagle is the first 127-qubit processor available outside North America. IBM describes it as ‘utility-scale,’ which it defines as enabling scientists to explore new problems.

“The limit of what can be simulated by a supercomputer is about 50 qubits, and it is possible to perform large-scale and complex calculations that would be impossible without a quantum computer,” said UTokyo executive vice president Hiroaki Aihara.

“By promoting research in a wide range of fields and realizing social implementation of quantum-related technologies, we aim to make a broad contribution to a future society with diversity and hope.”

UToyko is a member of the Japan-IBM Quantum Partnership initiative and participates in IBM quantum computing working groups, including healthcare and life sciences, high energy physics, materials and optimization.

Related:SoftBank and University of Tokyo Collaborate on Quantum Research

“By equipping UTokyo with a utility-scale IBM Quantum Systems One, we are excited to collaborate with QII Consortium organizations on the problems which we anticipate will push the limits of today's quantum systems and begin to extract scientific and business value,” said IBM Quantum vice president Jay Gambetta.

This article first appeared on IoT World Today's sister site, Enter Quantum.

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About the Author(s)

Berenice Baker

Editor, Enter Quantum

Berenice is the editor of Enter Quantum, the companion website and exclusive content outlet for The Quantum Computing Summit. Enter Quantum informs quantum computing decision-makers and solutions creators with timely information, business applications and best practice to enable them to adopt the most effective quantum computing solution for their businesses. Berenice has a background in IT and 16 years’ experience as a technology journalist.

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