Connects decision-makers and solutions creators to what's next in quantum computing

PQCA consortium includes AWS, Cisco, Google, IBM, NVIDIA, QuSecure and SandboxAQ

John Potter

February 14, 2024

2 Min Read
A cybersecurity lock image
PQCA aims to advance and encourage the adoption of post-quantum cryptography. Getty

The Linux Foundation recently announced the formation of the Post-Quantum Cryptography Alliance (PQCA), an initiative aimed at fostering the advancement and widespread adoption of post-quantum cryptography. This alliance represents a collaborative effort, uniting industry giants, academic researchers, and developers to tackle the imminent cryptographic security challenges brought about by the evolution of quantum computing.

A key objective of the PQCA is the development of high-assurance software, which aligns with the cryptographic requirements outlined in the U.S. National Security Agency's (NSA) Cybersecurity Advisory regarding the Commercial National Security Algorithm Suite 2.0. The NSA initiative underlines the increasing importance of cryptographic agility in the face of rapidly advancing quantum computing technologies.

The need for robust cryptographic defenses against potential quantum computing threats has never been more critical. In response, the PQCA has garnered support from a consortium of leading technology firms and academic institutions, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Cisco, Google, IBM, IntellectEU, Keyfactor, Kudelski IoT, NVIDIA, QuSecure, SandboxAQ and the University of Waterloo. This collective effort is dedicated to safeguarding sensitive data and communications in a future where quantum computing is prevalent.

Related:US Air Force Awards Quantum Contracts

"By establishing an open and collaborative environment for innovation, the PQCA will help accelerate the development and adoption of post-quantum cryptography in open source and beyond," said Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin.

The PQCA plans to engage in multiple technical projects to fulfill its mission. These include the development of software for evaluating, prototyping, and deploying innovative post-quantum algorithms, thus facilitating their practical application across various industries.

This initiative builds upon the foundational work of its founding members, who have been instrumental in the transition to post-quantum cryptography. Notably, several members have significantly contributed to the standardization of post-quantum cryptography, including co-authoring the first four algorithms selected in the NIST Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization Project.

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