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IBM to establish a new Quantum Computational Center in collaboration with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

John Potter

July 4, 2023

1 Min Read
IBM's Quantum System One quantum computer.
IBM's Quantum System One quantum computer. IBM

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) has announced that it plans to be the world’s first university to house an IBM Quantum System One. IBM expects its quantum computer to be operational by January 2024 and to serve as the foundation for a new IBM Quantum Computational Center, established in collaboration with RPI. 

RPI's quantum computing research initiative is set to receive a significant boost with philanthropic funding of over $150 million from Curtis Priem, vice chair of RPI's Board of Trustees. The establishment of the Curtis Priem Quantum Constellation, a faculty-endowed collaborative research center, will feature the new quantum computer as a centerpiece to attract additional faculty leaders who are passionate about advancing the field.

RPI’s vision is to significantly improve the educational experiences and research capabilities of students and researchers at RPI and other institutions. It also aims to propel New York’s Capital Region into a top location for talent and accelerate the state’s growth as a technology epicenter through collaboration.

“RPI is expanding on our long-standing collaboration with IBM to harness cutting-edge computing to solve global challenges while training the next-generation workforce in quantum,” said RPI President Marty A. Schmidt. “The Capital Region and the State of New York will benefit greatly from our new quantum computational center, which will significantly improve our area’s research capabilities.”  

Related:IBM Demonstrates Quantum Utility for Materials Discovery Use Case

IBM’s 127-qubit Quantum Eagle processor will power the IBM Quantum System One at RPI. The processor can perform utility-scale calculations, defined as the point at which quantum computers can be used as scientific tools to explore problems that remain intractable for classical methods. The agreement with IBM includes a commitment to provide a system upgrade to RPI in 2026.

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