Connects decision-makers and solutions creators to what's next in quantum computing

Riken Institute intends to connect it to the Fugaku supercomputer in 2025

John Potter

March 14, 2023

1 Min Read
A Riken quantum computer
The Riken Institute plans to make its quantum computer available to a wide range of businesses and academic institutions. Riken Institute

Japan’s Riken research institute is to make the country's first domestically built quantum computer available online at the end of March, enabling businesses and academic institutions to use its computing capabilities for research.

The 64-qubit quantum computer will reduce electrical resistance by using superconducting circuits cooled at extremely low temperatures. It will compete with IBM's 27-qubit quantum computer, which entered operation in Kawasaki, Japan, in 2021.

Consortium participants led by the University of Tokyo currently have access to the IBM quantum computer in Kawasaki. Toyota Motor and Sony Group are among the companies participating in the consortium.

The government-funded Riken Institute plans to make its quantum computer available to a wide range of businesses and academic institutions. According to Riken Center for Quantum director Yasunobu Nakamura the Japanese government “requested (Riken) to create a domestic computer that everyone can use as soon as possible.”

Since the technology is relatively new, Riken's quantum computer is still a prototype. Riken intends to connect it to the Fugaku supercomputer in 2025 to expand its real-world use cases. The quantum computer would handle core processing in this configuration.

Related:Riken Institute Plans Quantum-Supercomputer Hybrid by 2025

Japan’s Quantum Race 

According to Japan's Science and Technology Agency, China had the most patents worldwide for quantum computing between 1990 and 2021, with about 2,700. With roughly 2,200 patents, the U.S. came in second and Japan was third with 885.

Japan seeks to quickly advance its quantum computing capabilities, using its first in-house quantum computer as a springboard. Fujitsu is receiving technical assistance from Riken and has set a goal of developing a quantum computer by fiscal 2023.

The University of Tokyo and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone have developed a quantum computing strategy using photonics technology. They hope to make their quantum computer available through the cloud by 2024.

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